The Story of Edgar & I: A Bromance~ Albany Poets

C__Data_Users_DefApps_AppData_INTERNETEXPLORER_Temp_Saved Images_12113391_10206803572865637_8255685413926575281_oSome memories that I am always reminded of around this time of the year and on Halloween in this new edition of The Half Dead Poet Review:

The Half-Dead Poet Review: The Story of Edgar and I, a Bromance

Resurrection

Looks can sometimes be deceiving.

For every hero there’s a nemesis, and for every genius there’s a nothing. And for every new day there is always a night. The truth is not necessarily what you see or in the moment believe but exists in those things which you have made, created and that stand, that hold meaning. Those things that are treasured long after you’ve left the building or this weary world behind. These are the true works of art, poetry and literature. Our children in both physical & metaphysical, spiritual and living form. There is never an ending to our stories even after we are gone. Every moment is a beginning. Every moment a resurrection.

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~ Talon {R.M. Engelhardt}

#poetry #Talon #art #Troyny

Faith To Believe In

“Every day we slaughter our finest impulses. That is why we get a heartache when we read those lines written by the hand of a master and recognize them as our own, as the tender shoots which we stifled because we lacked the faith to believe in our own powers, our own criterion of truth and beauty. Every man, when he gets quiet, when he becomes desperately honest with himself, is capable of uttering profound truths. We all derive from the same source. There is no mystery about the origin of things. We are all part of creation, all kings, all poets, all musicians; we have only to open up, only to discover what is already there.”

—   Henry Miller

David Tennant Resuscitates Shakespeare in Brooklyn — Observer

‘There’s alchemy in those words, and when it starts sparking in your brain it is magical.’

via David Tennant Resuscitates Shakespeare in Brooklyn — Observer

Light

The deal is no matter what, no matter how bad things get or are that we try. Even in the worst of times we must remember there will be light, someone, somewhere waiting.

~ R.M. Engelhardt
The Bones of Our Existence
http://www.thepoemremains.com

Steinbeck

Steinbeck

There ain’t no sin and there ain’t no virtue.

There’s just stuff people do.”

~ John Steinbeck

___________

He was and still is a huge influence on my writing to this day. His work, you may find is also an influence on my new book, “The Bones of Our Existence, A Journal 2046”. The daily struggle of mankind and humanity, compassion, will always exist. Bukowski once said it’s how we walk through the fire. Steinbeck’s books showed us how.

In the end?

We are all survivors.

~R.M. Engelhardt

In The End

In the end, I am not interested in that which I fully understand. The words I’ve written over the years are just a veneer. There are truths that lie beneath the surface of the words. Truths that rise up without warning like the humps of a sea monster – and then disappear. What performance and song is to me is finding a way to tempt that monster to the surface. To create a space where the creature can break through what is real and what is known to us. This shimmering space, where imagination and reality intercept. This is where all love and tears and joy exist. This is the place. This is where we live.”

—   Nick Cave, 20,000 days on Earth

The Bones of Our Existence, A Journal 2046 Coming March 15th …

In the dark times
Will there also be singing?
Yes, there will also be singing
About the dark times.”

—   Bertolt Brecht

The Bones of Our Existence 2016

R.M. Engelhardt‘s new book The Bones of Our Existence, A Journal 2046 will be revealed March 15, 2016 online and is “an entirely new concept in regards to the way the book is to be released as well as to be presented.”

This book will be absolutely free to the public and is one man’s journal of poems set in the aftermath of the post-apocalyptic future of 2046 written by an unknown survivor who in the forms of prose and poetry looks back and reflects upon his life, loves and battles (within and without) over the last some 40 years.

The book is part science fiction, part humanity and even part Thoreau, but mostly it is the memoir of a man, who like the future we all thought would get better, has lost his way but who still believes that the words, our souls and our voices, poetry still … and will always matter.

Look for this and other book related news here at http://www.rmengelhardt.com